Questions about The Five Taoist Yin

Questions about The Five Taoist Yin

questions about The Five Taoist Yin

Working with the Yin Meridians - Metal
#trueqigong #qigong #DesLawton

Over the decades I have had the opportunity to answer many questions about the Five Taoist Yin (AKA the Five Yin) Qigong that have been asked by my students. I’m sure that there are plenty of other questions out there and that some practitioners may already be asking some of the same questions so I thought that it would be a good idea to add them to the Pro Holistic blog. That should, in theory at least, give practitioners who are not my direct students the chance to find the answers that they seek. If you have a question, or can add to an answer, please use the comments box.

Question from Robert

Is there a particular sequence for this set?

Answer from Des

Hello Robert,
Each of these Qigong can be done as an individual exercise if the practitioner wants to focus on that particular quality. However when you want to perform the entire set it is most beneficial if done in either of these two sequences: –

  • Using the Sheng Cycle, the feeding cycle, of Fire – Earth – Metal – Water – Wood.  Depending on what Element you wish to finish on (to focus on most) you start with the next Element in the sequence.
  • Using the Ke Cycle, the controlling cycle, of Fire – Metal – Wood – Earth – Water. Again, if you start on the next Element in the sequence to the one want to finish/focus on.

Regards,
Des

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Question from Lorraine

First thank you so much for sharing your knowledge.

When you talk about the tip of the tongue touching the palate….   Well.. should I be removing my full upper denture in order to actually touch the physical palate ?    Or is it more an energy connection that will work “through” the denture material? 

I know it seems a siily question,  but it is nagging me  to no ends.

Again many thanks for sharing.

and apologies too. ..  I already bought 3 other of your courses through Udemy.  before I got to lesson 32.  🙁      But I will keep your website in mind from now on.

Cordially,

         Lorraine

Answer from Des

Hello Lorraine,

LOL, the denture can stay in place………..

The position of the tongue is rather like the postures, stretches and tensions we use to help guide the Qi. By using this position we are “programming” our Qi to follow the microcosmic orbit, flowing up Du Mai (Governing Vessel) and down Ren Mai (Conception Vessel).

There are actually three different positions that are used in Qigong with this being the most used. The positions, through practice, determine the direction of flow and what Vessels are being used.

I’m glad that you are enjoying the Qigong.

Kind regards,

Des

Reply from Lorraine

many many thanks for this quick reply. I have now,  one less distraction to worry about when practicing  🙂

Lorraine

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Question from Irina

This was my first introduction to Qigong and I have really enjoyed it. I’ve been suffering with vertigo for the last couple of months. Based on the Shen cycle my understanding is that I should end it with the water element. Should I keep doing the same cycle or should I switch it up at some point? What next course would you recommend? Thank you!

Answer from Des

Hello Irina,

Yes, if you are performing the entire set you should finish with Water if you are suffering with vertigo. Depleted Kidney Qi is often associated with dizziness and vertigo so you might benefit from practicing the Kidney exercise (and any other Kidney Qi Qigong you know).

The depleted Kidney Qi may be caused by either Metal not feeding it, or Wood demanding too much. I would therefore recommend that you practice the Lung exercise followed by the Kidney exercise for at least a week.

Connecting Heaven and Earth (as taught in the course) is a great 5 Elements Qigong that will help to keep your entire system in balance.

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Question from Lessen

Hi Des!
I’m fairly struggling with the moves at the beginning, and really would like to try to perfect my position before moving along with the course. Am I doing a mistake? Should I first go through all lessons and then come back to them to perfect my position and moves?

Answer from Des

For most people, the Fire exercise is the one that takes the most time and effort to learn.

You can break it down into two components and work with what is happening below the waist (remembering to keep the crown raised at all times. You can then focus more on what the hands are doing.

Work your way through the entire set. You will find some are much easier to learn and by continued practice of the whole set you will find that your body will start to settle into the movements.

When I am teaching this set, in a live situation, it is tha Fire exercise that demands the most time.

I hope that this helps.

Des

Reply from Lessen

This helps exactly as needed! I will then follow along and repeat the process 🙂
Thanks a million Des!

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Question from Robert

like this course and explanation most why no follow along at the end des

Answer from Des

I assume you mean a video with all of the exercises done in sequence?

As explained in the Introduction to the Five Taoist Yin Qigong video, each of these Qigong can be done as an individual exercise if the practitioner wants to focus on that particular quality.

However whe you want to perform the entire set it is most beneficial if done in either of these two sequences: –

– Using the Sheng Cycle, the feeding cycle, of Fire – Earth – Metal – Water – Wood.  Depending on what Element you wish to finish on (to focus on most) you start with the next Element in the sequence.

– Using the Ke Cycle, the controlling cycle, of Fire – Metal – Wood – Earth – Water. Again, if you start on the next Element in the sequence to the one want to finish/focus on.

I’m sure that you will appreciate that with so many options it would be problematic to either film all the options or to pick one in preference over the others.

Regards,
Des

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Question from Prashant Srivastava

How safe are these Qigongs?
If we don’t get them exactly right, are we jeopardizing our Qi? Is there any particular Qigong to be more cautious about?

Answer from Des

Hello Prashant,
These exercises are safe to practice. The very worst you could do is, through lack of proper focus, enhance your Qi in another meridian.
There are other Qigong that can be dangerous if practiced improperly by someone with limited experience. These are Inner Sanctum and I only teach them  face to face, on an individual basis. As these will never be taught online by me and as I am not aware of all the Qigong (including faux qigong) that is being broadcast on Udemy I cannot answer this further.
Kind regards,
Des Lawton

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Question from Kuraijam

What is the optimum duration of practice singly as well as in sequence?

Answer from Des

I would normally teach each exercise for eight respirations. With Fire and Earth that means eight respirations to each side. However, with personal practice I don’t count but it probably averages out the same.

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Question from Shaz

For the Metal / Lung exercise is there are correct way to rotate the hands? Do that rotate around the thumb, around the centre longest finger, around the baby finger). These all feel different to me so was wondering if there are any guidelines or suggestions.

Answer from Des

For the Lung exercise:-

  • Just turn the palm upwards without the need to focus on any particular axis (this is the same when you turn the palm downward). Your focus should already be on the thumb as you do this.
  • Then “extend” through the thumbs as you open the arms. By this I mean that you slightly stretch the thumbs physically (as though you were giving directions and pointing with the thumb) and, more importantly, guiding the Qi to LU11 and through it.
  • By having awareness of LU1 opening as you are conscious of the Qi extending through LU11 you will appreciate the connection between the two and gradually your experience of the entire energy field (meridian) will become more substantial.

Regards,
Des

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Question from Ruth

Hi Des,
Thanks a lot for the fantastic Qigong classes on Udemy.
I’ve got a question regarding the horse stance. I was told that the knees need to be over the feet to prevent knee injury as they are not weight bearing but weight transferring joints. It doesn’t look like that from your demonstration. Could you please explain a bit more? Thanks a lot.
Kind regards,
Ruth

Answer from Des

Hello Ruth,
When doing/learning most Kung Fu it is correct that if you are in a low horse stance the knees should be above the feet. But the emphasis there is on building physical strength in the legs as well as stretching the Adductor muscles. In most cases, people tend to push too far and there is a fair bit of discomfort……….. The term “No pain, no gain” seems to be the anthem.
In Qigong, in the Taoist Qigong that I was taught, the emphasis is on quiet stability that allows you to be aware of the Qi flow rather than on the pain of a stretch. Even so, if you stand with your feet double shoulder width apart and let your body sink through relaxation and have an outward intention for the knees (thinking outwards continually realigns the knees) you will find that when you finally achive a low horse stance (if this is your goal) your knees will be over your feet.
As a teacher I am fully aware that students will try to follow my breathing pattern, my stances, etc. so I am careful to start at the most comfortable for them and then watch them progress.

Answer from Ruth

Hi Des,
Thank you so much for your quick answer. It all makes sense now. I like the outward intention when practicing horse stance so that the knees don’t knock together.
I guess it will be like the 70/30 rule (or rule of thirds). Don’t push it! A deep horse stance will develop with time and practice.
I wish you and your family a very happy and healthy New Year.
Kind regards,
Ruth

Interested in Qigong? We have a group of Qigong enthusiasts (on Facebook) that you might want to join that is used by students and teachers to exchange ideas and ask questions. It is part of the San Bao Qigong.

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